Skip directly to content

Blogs

Staying in Harpers Ferry-Updated for 2015!

on Fri, 12/20/2013 - 02:58

Since the walk should take about 17 hours, expect to arrive in Harpers Ferry by 9 p.m. and no later than 10:00 p.m. We officially end at Econo Lodge.

There are several places to stay and it's off season. Here's our recommendation:

The Econo Lodge has 49 rooms, is close to the end of the walk, and is rated as very clean and basic lodging. 

Econo Lodge 
25 Union Street, Harpers Ferry, WV, US, 25425 
website: Click here.
Phone: (304) 535-6391 

 

Other Harpers Ferry Lodging

We are now recommending everyone stay at the Econo Lodge.  Our travel package will save you money through the FreeWalkers.

Staying near Start - Potomac MD

on Thu, 12/19/2013 - 18:47

We highly advise you to consider staying over Friday night at one of the two lockhouses that are reserved for FreeWalkers. We had a very pleasurable experience last year, our first year renting out these building exclusively for our use. You get to experience life in the historic building and enjoy a dinner and good company. The cost/value is the best you will find and you will help support our program by doing so. It takes a lot of effort to organize this event and we need participation to make it work right. Check out our Full Travel option and save and enjoy Friday night before the event -

My first 100K or the value of training

on Sun, 12/01/2013 - 05:00

by Imants P.

Here's one walker's opinion on walking long distance events, including the 50-Mile Kennedy Walk 2013. Practice and conditioning are the key to a successful outcome, but results may vary...

The first time I heard about the Sierra Club One-Day-Hike (ODH) was in March of 2012 when I bumped into the organizer Mike Darzi on the Northwest Branch trail near Silver Spring, MD. In one minute Mike was able to convince me to try one of the ODH events. With relatively short training on top of my already decent shape I finished the 50K in good time.

The Summer of 62

on Thu, 01/17/2013 - 02:01

This is a post from John Brennan that appeared in 50Milehikers.ning.com - was originally posted as the "Summer of 62'" on Jan 5, 2010, Not sure the dating here because the 50-mile hike took off in 1963, but the article sure demonstrates the spirit of the times. Did California lead the way?

The Summer of '62?

What made the year especially memorable for me was a hike I took with two fellow thirteen-year old school friends. Mind you, this was no ordinary jaunt, and no ordinary event.

Walking 50 Miles: Tucson 1963

on Wed, 01/16/2013 - 22:36

Jim Magner, author of A Haunting Beauty: Vietnam Through the Eyes of an Artist (ahauntingbeauty.com), relives his 1963 experience walking 50 miles in Arizona during the 50-mile Hike craze. HIs  journey, told in 5 parts follows:

 Part One, the stage is set.

It was a Friday night in early February, 1963. My buddies Gene and Richard, and I, along with a couple of other guys who walked the dogs between races at “Greyhound Park,” drove to a canyon 20 miles northeast of Tucson in my 55 Ford convertible.

Log for PK's 38-mile Walk - 2/7/09

on Tue, 11/27/2012 - 02:28

My plan was to take a 50-mile walk following the same path Robert F. Kennedy chose for his historic 50 mile walk in 1963 at this same time that year. I was motivated to see how this hike would have felt for him and also as a way to try and relive my attempt at a 50 mile walk in the summer of 1963. (Click here to learn more about the 50-Mile Hike Phenomenon back then)




According to the news of February 9, 1963, Robert F. Kennedy chose to walk along the banks of the Potomac on the towpath of the C&O Canal National Park in 20 degree weather. He started his walk at 5:00 a.m.

Attempt at 50-Miles in the Summer of '63

on Mon, 11/26/2012 - 07:09

Originally Written December 9, 2008

I've been searching my mind for exactly why four of us hiked from Roselle to Netcong, New Jersey (nearly 50 miles) when we were 15 years old. It was a heady time in America when a dynamic young president, JFK, challenged everyone (see The 50-Mile Hike Phenomenon). And, it seemed at that time that we, as individuals and as a nation, could meet those challenges. Of course, there's also a certain invincible attitude that comes with being a young teenage male that probably accounted for much of our reasoning.

We set out by ourselves early one hot hazy mid-summer